Cognitive Impairments

Wireless Technology Use and Disability: Results from a National Survey

Access to and use of wireless consumer technology (e.g., mobile devices like cellphones and tablets, software and services) has become critical to social and economic participation. This is especially true for people with disabilities. This article presents data from the Survey of User Needs (SUN) conducted by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC) from September 2012 through April 2013. The SUN focuses on wireless use among people with...

Use of Social Media during Public Emergencies by People with Disabilities

 People with disabilities are generally more vulnerable during disasters and publicemergencies than the general population. Physical, sensory and cognitive impairments may result ingreater difficulty in receiving and understanding emergency alert information, and greater difficulty intaking appropriate action. The use of social media in the United States has grown considerably inrecent years. This has generated increasing interest on the part of national, state and localjurisdictions in...

Wireless Technology Uses and Activities by People with Disabilities

Access to and use of wireless consumer technology (e.g., mobile devices like cellphones, smartphones, tablets, software and services) has become ever more critical to social and economic participation, particularly for people with disabilities. Rates of ownership of wireless devices among people with disabilities have risen considerably in recent years, narrowing substantially the gap in ownership rates with the general population. But what do people with disabilities actually do with their...

Futures of Disabilities: Is technology failing us?

This paper examines possible reasons why technology may not be living up to its promise for some people with disabilities (including poor policy implementation, low accessibility, cost, disinterest, lack of awareness, prejudice) and describes preliminary results from the first round of a futures-oriented Delphi survey.

Hearing Aid Compatibility of Cellphones: Results from a National Survey

Decades of technological development have not guaranteed compatibility between cellphones and hearing aids. Federal regulations have attempted to reduce the variability in interoperability between these two types of devices by requiring cellphone handset manufacturers and wireless service providers to offer a certain percentage of their devices with sufficiently reduced electromagnetic radiation (meeting American National Standards Institute’s M3 and T3 ratings for acoustic and...

EyeRemember: Memory Aid App for Google Glass

Changes in memory are one of the most frequently reported cognitive deficits among people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and are one of the factors with the greatest impact on independence and quality of life following injury. Evidence supports the use of external aids in the treatment of memory impairments in adults following TBI. This article describes the development and initial user-testing of a mobile app designed to run on Google Glass to serve as an external memory aid for people...

Use of Mainstream Wireless Technology by Adults who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Cellphones, smartphones and tablets offer considerable potential to enhance the independence and social and economic participation of people with disabilities. The rapid proliferation of smartphones and tablets has offered new low-cost speech generating options on mainstream platforms for users of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices. Data are presented from the Survey of User Needs (SUN), a national survey on use of mobile wireless technology by people across several...

Optimizing Accessibility of Wireless Emergency Alerts: 2015 Survey Findings

The Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) system is a free, opt-out, national emergency alerting service that was deployed in 2012 as one component of the Integrated Public Alert and Warning Systems (IPAWS). Since 2012 over 10,000 WEA messages have been transmitted to mobile phones in the U.S. In 2015, a national online survey on WEAs (2015 WEA Survey) was conducted to understand the effectiveness of WEA messages for people with disabilities. The survey collected data on availability, awareness and...

Innovation and Wearable Computing: A Proposed Framework for Collaborative Policy Design

The rapidly expanding market for wearable computing devices (wearables), driven by the confluence of information and communication technology and public acceptance of a design aesthetic, suggests nearly limitless potential for consumer uses. As adoption of wearables spreads, there are cultural and social impacts that represent both barriers and opportunities, with subsequent public policy ramifications. All too often designers, technologists, and policymakers operate independently;...

Assets, Actions, Attitudes: Hearing and Vision Impaired Mobile Technology Personas

 Designers and engineers utilize personas and user profiles to give life and substance to user research findings. The pace of development and diffusion of mobile wireless technologies make modeling of consumer profiles ever more critical, especially for people with disabilities, for whom mobile technology can be either empowering or disenfranchising. Fueled by global competition and government policy in the US and elsewhere, inclusive design has become a priority for wireless device...

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Disclaimer

The contents of this website were developed under a grant from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant number 90RE5025-01-00). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this website do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ACL, HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.